Select a School...
Select a School

Begin your legacy. Leave your mark.

  • SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

     

  • CONTACT

     

    Mrs. Theresa Ritter, M.A.

    Science Chairperson

    theresa.ritter@holycrosshighschool.org

    (856) 461-5400 x3102

     

  • SCIENCE FACULTY

     

    Mrs. Theresa Ritter, M.A.

     

    Sr. Claudette Naylor, M.S.

     

    Ms. Rebecca Steiger, B.A.

     

    Mr. Robert Waters, B.A.


  • Students are required to complete 3 years of science for the graduation requirement. There are two required courses: Biology and Chemistry or Biology and Environmental Science. For that third year requirement, students may choose from a variety of science electives. However, students intending to major in science, engineering, or applied science in college are strongly advised to pursue a year of physics, since these programs typically require one year of high school physics in addition to the biology and chemistry requirement. 


     

    4030 Biology 1

    Grade: 9

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): None

     

    This required course covers all the basic biology concepts including characteristics of living things, cell biology, genetics, evolution and natural selection, biodiversity and ecology. This core curriculum meets the national science standards. Other topics may be introduced as time permits. Laboratory investigations, cooperative learning activities and class projects are incorporated throughout the course.


     

    4035 Honors Biology

    Grade: 9

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): This course is open by invitation only based on a student’s standardized scores, writing samples and placement test.

     

    This course is designed to meet the needs of those students who aspire to major in science by preparing them for advanced placement biology. This intensive course will infuse in-depth laboratory investigations, including dissection on the frog, data collection and written laboratory reports. Topics include biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution and ecology. The concepts included in this course are studied in greater detail with emphasis on laboratory activities and current research and development while incorporating technology.


     

    4050 Chemistry

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): Biology

     

    This course is designed to meet the needs of COLLEGE-BOUND students. Chemistry assumes a working knowledge of Algebra I and related problem-solving skills. Success in this course requires retention and application of the early chapters for the remainder of the semester. The curriculum is a logical sequence of topics beginning with matter and energy and progressing through a study of atomic theory and structure, the periodic table, bonding, formulas and equations, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases and oxidation-reduction reactions.


     

    4055 Honors Chemistry

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): A in Biology I or B in Honors Biology I

    +Standardized test scores may also be used to determine placement

     

    This course is an intensive examination of the nature, composition and properties of matter. Topics covered include the classification of matter, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solids and liquids, atomic theory, inter-atomic and intermolecular bonding, oxidation-reduction, chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics, acid-base reactions and thermodynamics. Other topics may be introduced as time permits. In addition to tests and quizzes, laboratory work is incorporated throughout the course. Students selecting this course must apply their abstract reasoning and mathematical skills in solving problems.


     

    4040 Environmental Science

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): Biology 1

     

    This laboratory course is recommended for students with a general knowledge of basic mathematical principles, who are interested in examining the interactions existing between the environment and technology. The goal of the course is to establish an awareness of the environment through concept-building experiences. The course will examine the structure of ecosystems through discussions on elements, life, organization and energy. A variety of laboratory activities will be provided and projects required to help students understand the science behind environmental problems like acid rain and ozone depletion.


     

    4320 Forensic Science

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): Grade 10 students are required to have had a C or above in Biology 1

     

    This course will use forensic science as a vehicle for the practice of science as inquiry. Students will learn the methodology needed to investigate and evaluate a crime scene, the proper lab techniques needed to evaluate evidence and how to prepare between a known and an unknown. Students will learn how DNA fingerprinting and other forensic tests can be used to solve a crime. Students will use the scientific method (observation, collection of data, forming and testing hypotheses, advancing conclusions and communicating results) in an effort to determine what has happened at crime scenes. Topics include processing a crime scene, forensic anthropology, forensic entomology, DNA evidence, fingerprinting, hair and fiber analysis, and counterfeiting/forgery.


     

    4060 General Physics

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): C or above in Chemistry

     

    This course discusses topics in classical mechanics, waves and modern physics so that the student develops a broad understanding of the forces that move the physical universe. Laboratory work and projects are used to develop understanding of the basic principles of physics.


     

    4065 Honors Physics

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): B or above in Honors Chemistry or an A in Chemistry

    +Standardized test scores may also be used to determine placement

     

    This course treats the topics of classical mechanics, waves and modern physics in greater depth than in the general physics class. A non-calculus-based college physics text is used, modified by those examples common to high school curricula but skimmed over in the college text. Laboratory work and projects are used to develop understanding of the basic principles of physics.


     

    4310 Anatomy and Physiology

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): Grade 10 students are required to have had a C or above in Biology 1

     

    Anatomy and physiology is an elective course to upperclassmen who have demonstrated an aptitude in the biological sciences. Work begins with a general understanding of the human body-plan and the structure and function of tissues. The first half also includes the study of skin, skeletal and muscular systems. The second half covers the nervous system, digestive, reproductive, circulatory, excretory and respiratory systems. Students will investigate the anatomy of the human body by performing animal dissections and will gain a higher understanding of human physiology through a variety of laboratory techniques. This course is designed for students with a strong interest in a career in the biological sciences, allied health fields (i.e. nursing, EMTs, veterinary technicians, athletic training, medical technicians and physicians), medicine or the desire to explore such careers.

     

    Dissections are required.


     

    4330 Marine Biology

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): Grade 10 students are required to have had a C or above in Biology 1

     

    This course is designed for students who are interested in developing an understanding of the basic concepts of oceanography and marine biology. The major areas of study include chemical and physical factors of the ocean, marine plants, marine invertebrate, marine vertebrates, marine ecosystems, and marine ecology. Lab work will include, but in not limited to the dissection of one marine invertebrate and one marine vertebrate. This course is designed for students with a strong background in biology.


     

    The following courses are offered on a yearly rotation:

     

    4910 Advanced Placement Biology Offered (Offered again in SY 2017-2018)

    Grade: 10-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): B or above in Honors Biology 1 or an A in Biology I AND B or above in Honors Chemistry or an A in Chemistry

    +Standardized test scores may also be used to determine placement.

    Caution: This course requires a strong chemistry background.

    College credits are available through Seton Hall University (3 cr.) or Rowan College (6 cr.).

     

    The AP biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. This course differs significantly from the usual high school biology course with respect to the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work done by students and the time and effort required of students. The three primary areas of study are molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. The two main goals of AP biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The aim of this course is to provide students the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and the analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.

     

    Students must take the advanced placement exam in May.


    4920 Advanced Placement Environmental Science

    Grade: 11-12

    5 Credits

    Semester Prerequisite(s): B or above in Honors Biology 1 or an A in Biology I AND B or above in Honors Chemistry or an A in Chemistry

    Caution: This course requires a strong chemistry background.

     

    This course provides students with a learning experience equivalent to that of an introductory, half-year college course in environmental science. Students will explore the interactions of living systems with each other and the interactions with the environment through public policy and practice in conservation. Students will be exposed to the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Observations and measurements in the field, as well as statistical analysis of online databases will enhance student understanding of the human-environment relationship Grades are based upon at-home and in-class work, laboratory reports, and tests.

     

    Students will be expected to take the AP exam in May.

CLOSE